Portfolio Sample 2

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THE "ULTIMATE GUIDE" BLOG POST COVERS A-Z OF A TOPIC - THIS ONE HAS 5000+ WORDS

If your aim is to get eyeballs, links, shares, and repeat visits of readers, you may like to write a mega-guide post … to give your readers the whole nine yards on a topic. 

Long form “ultimate guide” posts are among the most widely shared and linked to. Parts of the post can be repurposed later into other formats such as podcasts, or video, or ebooks. 

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Mompreneurs: A Guide To Making Both Family And Business Rewarding

Portfolio Item 2 - Ultimate Guide Blog Post

What is a “mompreneur”? Mothers with young kids, who cannot go out to work, may have a yen for a home-based business. They can become “mompreneurs” (moms who are entrepreneurs). They need to maneuver through their challenges and increase their resourcefulness to succeed. The 2019 State of Women-Owned Business Report says this. Of all women-owned businesses, about 1 in 3 has a mom as an owner. That’s amazing – because it adds up to more than 4 million mompreneurs.

CONTENTS:

VIDEO: Watch Julie White, an inspiring business mom, talk of success (Must watch: 2:39 minutes)

If you want a quick taste of the “mompreneur” life and some clever ways to make it work, this is a must-watch video. It’s a short but succinct video, titled: “A Mompreneur Shares 4 Ways to Build a Successful Business”. So sit back for a couple of minutes, and let yourself seep into the subject before you read on …

1. What makes a mompreneur a distinct type of solopreneur

Most mompreneurs are solopreneurs who have chosen to solo-run home-based businesses out of need. Young mothers with young kids have always found it to be a precarious financial balance if they work at traditional jobs outside the home, especially when their young brood needs minute-minute childcare. Here are just a few of the problems they face:

  • The financials just don’t add up: Mothers may earn a lot in their 9-5 jobs, but they also have to spend an enormous amount on childcare support. In the end, for many mothers, the math just doesn’t add up. They end up with very little money left over to spend on the small luxuries of home and family, even if they are earning high.

  • There is always guilt that they are not able to give their personal attention to their kids: Every mother suffers a lot of dismay to find that children constantly in the care of childcare assistants often grows away from the mother. It is heart-rending to find a mom returning from work, only to have to tear their own children away from the chidcare assistant whom they have grown more attached to. Kids remain sullen and morose when they have to spend time with their real mothers who they may see as “abadoners”. All around, the situation is very unhappy for both the mothers and their children.

  • Single mothers, especially, get the rough end of the stick: Some of them, finding their jobs not paying enough even to cover childcare help, have perforce to do two jobs, which only exacerbates the family problems. These moms barely see their children in their awake hours, creeping in and out of the house when their kids are asleep. This is no life to live.

Contrast all this with the life of a mompreneur. If a mom can go into business from home, do a business that’s easy to handle while keeping an eye on the kids herself, costs little to start, and pays enough to cover a decent and comfortable life – why would she not be tempted to go into mompreneurship? Many moms have started with trepidation and fear and actually grown into millionaires.

Altough most moms fear the future in the mompreneur business, research has shown their fears to be wrong.

PicMonkey, an image editing and design platform did another survey of 100 mompreneurs (they called them “doers”) and wannabe-mompreneurs (they called them “dreamers”). Results of their study showed these stats:

  • Nearly 80% of dreamers were concerned about the financial investment associated with starting their own businesses, but only 57% of doers actually experienced this as an obstacle.

  • 70% dreamers believe they won’t be able to find the time to run their business, whereas fewer than half of doers (47%) actually struggled with time management.

  • Approximately 75% of dreamers were concerned about monetizing their products/services, versus 60% percent of doers who managed monetization comfortably.

2. The outstanding benefits to enjoy by being a mompreneur

Although being a mompreneur has its tough times, the perks of this business workstyle are many. Especially for single moms, there are a lot of advantages in being able to work from home, while also keeping an eye on the kids. Here are just a few of benefits:

  • You can work part-time as a business woman. It’s up to you to decide how to balance your time between work and family. Your hours are flexible to run your mompreneur business.

  • Women are great at multi-tasking, which is what you’ll be doing most of the time. You will always be a Jack-Of-All-Trades mompreneur.

  • You can save money on childcare and sometimes it’s a big deal. If you can care for your kids yourself, or get free family support, you can have the best of both worlds. It’s also wonderful to be able to spend time around your kids when they are growing up.

  • The income potential is limitless for a stay-at-home mompreneurs. This can be achieved provided you are able to choose a line of work that you can handle easily, and you give business the time to grow. Like children, businesses too have to be well-raised.

  • You can work in a career you love, being your own boss, and deciding what success means to you. You can also change your mind about all this as your business and kids grow up. No one is holding you down to a plan that remains static.

3. The downsides to contend with in being a mompreneur

While there are many advantages to mompreneurship, it helps to know – and be ready for – the downsides to this business model. Moms who just leap into businesses from home, without thinking about the negatives that are possible, will rue their hastiness. So here’s what to look out for:

  • You need a lot of self-discipline as a personality trait. If you have issues about procrastination, laziness, lack of persistence, or too many ebbs of energy levels, sort these out before you tackle business as a mompreneur.

  • It will be tough to face clients either personally or even over Zoom calls, without your kids running across the screen behind you. Clients and other important business people don’t make allowances for mompreneurs without the basic standards of professionalism.

  • If you can’t separate your personal and professional life, you’ll be in big trouble very soon. You’ll be making mistakes in both areas. In money issues, time management, and many other areas, you will need to keep business separate from family.

  • A mompreneur business may not have a steady income, and you’ll have to get used to high-earning and low-earning months. The stress of it can get to such high levels that you start taking out your frustrations on the kids.

  • It’s generally hard to expect to follow time schedules, because Murphy’s Law operates in mompreneurships. What can go wrong will go wrong. Better to stick to a To-Do list without time constraints, so you can edge in all the work to be done when time permits.

4. The challenges of a mompreneur business to anticipate

No two days in a mompreneur’s life will be alike. But the roller-coaster can be handled. It’s important to know your challenges, anticipate having regular trouble with them, and be forearmed with solutions to success. Plan to climb in business, despite the forces that seem to pull you down:

  • You may not have enough money for investing in the business in a big way. Women are generally never the type to look for bank loans or structured funding sources. They get started mostly by borrowing from friends or family (notably by cajoling husbands). But even if you should get such interest-free money, it may be far less than you need, so stay very thrifty in business.

  • Women, more than men, have Impostor Syndrome. Impostor Syndrome is where you always feel like an “impostor” if you succeed, because you think you don’t belong amongst the millionaires and billionaires. The problem is that you don’t dare to dream, and so you may never get there.

  • Homepreneurs are never taken seriously and “mompreneur” is always seen as a synonym for “micro-small business”. This needn’t be true at all, because there are great examples of women who have been mompreneur business-builders of immense success and money. Don’t let people think you’re only capable of a tiny business, just a shade higher than a hobby.

  • Poor self-care, and limited work benefits, affect many mompreneurs. They forget there’s a third item on their equations after child-care and business-care – it’s self-care. Unless you make room for your own wellbeing and physical and mental health, and protect yourself from burnouts, no one will do it for you. Get insurance and other financial plans in place.

  • The time/money/effort balancing act is harder than it sounds, when you start having to action it. For a while everything will feel like too much, and one area of life will be at war with another. But eventually, you will learn the knack of balancing, so cut yourself some slack till you get the hang of it.

5. The solutions to success for a mompreneur business

Taking lessons from some of the most successful mompreneurs, you can apply some of the ideas given below to your life. Every time you are tempted to second-guess your decision to have become a mompreneur, remember that you have made a very honorable choice. Pat yourself on the back for taking this route to earning, and add to your confidence by heeding this advice:

  • Don’t expect perfect days – and manage your time in a fluid way. There will be no perfect days ever. Not for a mompreneur, and in fact, not for any entrepreneur. Instead of rueing this, learn to flow from activity to activity fluidly instead of fretting and fuming, and wasting energy.

  • Remember, you have to work at your business as well as in it. What this means is that you can’t just chug along doing tasks without occasionally looking at the big picture of your business. Are you monitoring performance? Are you on track with business goals? Have you set achievable goals, or do they need tweaking? Have you set apart review time?

  • Learn to say “No” without feeling guilty – either to your family or to business vendors and customers. The ability to say “No” when it looks like you’re overstretched is a very good trait to cultivate. But you have to be able to do this without any guilt. If you put self-care above everything else, you will be able to balance business-care and family-care.

  • Learning is a lifelong necessity, so setting apart some time for extensive reading is important – or you’ll fall behind the curve. This is the part that most mompreneurs sacrifice. If you get time early morning before the family awakes, or late evening, when the family is asleep, use those times not for finishing work chores, but for incessant new learning.

  • Your sense of humor is what you will need in spades, so don’t ever lose it along the way. Life and work are not meant to be mirthless, serious, brow-furrowing anxieties. You have to enjoy life – and the main reason you wanted a business is to enjoy your life more, right?

6. Planning your mompreneur work space for productivity

There is a lot of romance in the thought that mompreneurs can work off the dining table, and need nothing more than a laptop – but ideally, this doesn’t work at all. Working off the dining table is the worst kind of idea, and there are reasons for this:

  • Your mompreneur workspace needs to be a designated corner of your home so you know it’s your “office”. Your kids too must know it’s “where you should not be disturbed”. This is the bare minimum boundary you need to set.

  • At the same time, your “office” needs to be within eye-view of where your kids are going to be playing around. So choose a vantage point that gives you the best of both worlds – work productivity and the satisfaction of having the kids just a glance away. (It isn’t tough – you cook in your kitchen while also keeping your eye on the kids, don’t you?)

  • Designing a separate working corner as a “home office space” puts you in the work mood. Even if the work corner is in a larger room where the kids play on a carpet nearby, you can keep an eye on them and yet switch to a work frame of mind when you cast your eye back to your working space.

  • You need ergonomic comfort when you work, and a writing table and chair are of a different height and design than a dining table and chair. Besides your mobile phones, tablets, and laptops – and other electronic gadgets of all models – need a multi-charging station nearby, which no dining table allows. You need to work without wires hanging askew all over the place. In fact, your device charging corner – and the whole room – needs also to be kid-proof to prevent electrical accidents.

  • You need good lighting that lets you work at your workspace early in the morning or late into the evening without affecting the children’s sleep. You also need enough shelf-and-storage space that is easy to declutter, and can house all your “office” needs and money, separate from the other items in your home.

  • A clock and calendar must have a place in your “office”, to keep you on track. If there’s also space for a bit of greenery around you, and a wall plaque that holds your business mission, that would be wonderfully uplifting.

The layout below is a perfect one for a home workspace for mompreneurs. You can fit the pieces of it into any corner or niche of your home that is within the visual range of the kids. Make it “your own space to think, write, be creative or do business from”.

Homw Office For Mompreneur

7. Business ideas for mompreneurs that are easy to handle

There are so many articles online that list business ideas for mompreneurs that it doesn’t bear repeating. I’ve pulled together some of the articles that are replete with business ideas that mompreneurs can examine if it fits them:

When you read these lists of ideas they usually fall into 2 categories: products you can create or buy and sell online; or services you can offer to individuals or groups of people online.

But there is a third option that is a really good business idea for mompreneurs – one where the workload is a bit less and the chances of profit are higher than otherwise.

The hybrid model of business for mompreneurs

In this model of business, you may be offering a product or service of your own. The smart thing to do is to bundle your product or service with a bunch of affiliate income-producing products that others sell – which can be complementary to your own products and afford the customer more ease, convenience, or better value for money.

Let’s examine a few examples of the hybrid model at work. Let’s say you produce an info product – for example, an ebook or course on low-fat Thai cooking. Instead of just aiming to sell your product to people, what if you could offer a bundle of your ebook or course, along with some Thai cooking pots and ladles, or measuring containers (all affiliate income products) that you can offer special deals on? The info product is a low-cost and high-profit item for you because it’s your own creation, but its convenience and attraction – and pricing – could increase when you can offer deals with products that are complementary.

The reason this hybrid model of “own-product-plus-affiliate-products” works so well for mompreneurs is that your repertoire of offerings never looks too thin or weak. Customers like to get expertise and comprehensive solutions for their pain points. If the solutions appear more complete, and the price-deal for the whole package is attractive, it’s a win-win. You win and your customer wins. Your offerings always look well put together and thought through. And not all your products are time-consuming to create or offer for you. Some part of your earnings can always come from “affiliate sources”, which can at least cover your costs, if not add to your profit.

8. Time management tips for multitasking mompreneurs

Mompreneurs are multi-taskers by instinct. But the successful ones don’t do two things at the same time, which is “simultaneous-tasking”. They slot activities one after another, some work and some home care, and they can switch between the two in a blink. I would also recommend three top time management tactics, because I know they work like a breeze …

a. Schedule in such a way that every activity has some wind-up time and wind-down time.

 

For example, your task list may say “Take baby to garden” and the next job may be “Plan for your next blog post”. Can you really just jump from one into another. There is the problem of the gears in your brain needing to crank themselves into a new mode of activity. See that every task has some wind-up time to get your brain flowing in the new direction, and a wind-down time to get the mind emptied for the next action.

 

b. Don’t pack more than 5 key priorities for one day, and see that you finish them.

 

Nothing is more daunting than a to-do list that runs like an endless coil of paper. Of course, a mompreneur will have ever so many small and big tasks to do. But remember to have two lists. One we’ll call a “Task Warehouse”, where you put task ideas as they occur to you to do. The other will be the “To-Do List” for the day with some daily “must-do chores” and maybe 4-5 items from your Task Warehouse as “would-be-great-to-complete” tasks.

 

c. It’s terrific to use the wee hours of your morning for “sharpening your saw”.

 

Unless your mind and body are humming with health, there will never be enough physical or mental energy to tackle your multifarious responsibilities as a mompreneur. The early morning hours are when you should not launch directly into work. Use the time to “sharpen your saw” ie. your body and mind, which are your most valuable tools for a creative and fulfilling life. Work out, do breathing exercises, do some calming meditation … and dedicate an hour to thinking about your health and yourself in a 360° way.

9. Money management tips for budget-stretched mompreneurs

Mompreneurs are multi-taskers by instinct. But the successful ones don’t do two things at the same time, which is “simultaneous-tasking”. They slot activities one after another, some work and some home care, and they can switch between the two in a blink. I would also recommend three top time management tactics, because I know they work like a breeze …

a. Always work out a budget – for your business and your home separately

 

You cannot afford not to know exactly how much you have coming in and going out each month. You have to get a clear and complete fix on what your business costs are likely to be each month. You don’t need an elaborate money-planner, just an Excel sheet is good enough. Don’t spend what you haven’t planned for, as far as possible. For emergencies, you should have a separate stash of money – which we’ll come to.

 

b. Keep building your emergency funds – call them savings if you wish

 

There’s a rule that my grandmother lived with, which she followed all her life. When she died, we were aghast to find she had stashed away hundreds of thousands of dollars from my grandfather’s meager pittance of a salary. What did she do to create so much out of almost nothing? Simple. When my grandfather gave her $200 for the home supplies, she put away 40% into an “emergency fund” (aka her stash), and then lived within the 60%. Can you do that regularly and with every bit of money coming in, without cheating yourself of that 40% put-away rule?

 

c. Always separate your home finances from your business finances

 

If you allow business money and home money to intermingle, life will get extremely complicated – especially at tax-filing time. You’ll have to spend days untangling everything you’ve spent or earned, to separate the home and business strands of money all knotted up. And do remember to keep separate bank accounts for your business and personal finances.

10. Outsource management tips for overwhelmed mompreneurs

There are three areas where mompreneurs may find it useful to outsource work:

a. Outsourcing business workload

 

Most often mompreneurs like to go for the all-rounder Virtual Assistant who can help with a variety of work projects (especially repetitive ones) than to find specialists for one or two areas of work. The exceptions to this are writers (if you find blogging and content marketing too consuming), or artists (if your work needs a lot of imaginative sketching or creation of infographics and other forms of specialized drawings). It’s also a very good idea to have a couple of techies on hand for the times when your site gets stuck and you are all stymied for help.

 

b. Outsourcing child care workload

 

Moms who prefer handling the business workloads themselves may like to get babysitters or childcare help, even if they are themselves at home to keep an eye on the kids. It helps to have someone attend to the kids’ meal times, play times, sleep times, and general well-being. If you can get someone to take care of the children for you for a certain number of hours a day, you can get your work done in that time too. You can keep an eye on the child care assistant, who can keep an eye on the kids.

 

c. Outsourcing home care workload

 

There are moms with just one child, who feel capable of both work and child care … but it’s the household cleaning and cooking and shopping help they need most. Someone who pops in every day – or maybe twice a week – to see that your home is shipshape, there’s food to put on the table, the larder is stocked with cooking ingredients, the laundry is done, and the gadgets are all in working condition and cleaned out, will be a great help.

11. Great books that can help mompreneur businesses

The ebooks below (available from Amazon) have scored high on buyer ratings …

Mompreneurs Book 1

Inspiring stories of highly successful entrepreneur moms having it all

Mompreneur Book 2

Best strategies to help moms successfully juggle parenting and entrepreneurship

Mompreneur Book 3

How to keep sane, make money and build your dreams while raising a family

12. Great courses for mompreneurs on a learning curve

The Udemy courses below are eminently affordable and also great value for money …

Mompreneur Course 1

5 legitimate full time businesses you can do right now from your home

Mompreneur Course 2

For not-so-techie mompreneurs with little time and a very small budget

Mompreneur Course 3

Setting boundaries, time management, productivity, avoiding burnout

13. Great blogs with valuable content for mompreneurs

The blogs on mompreneurship that I’ve picked here are great on content, style, differentiation …

a. Mompreneur Money: Owned by Kari Sayers, this blog inspires other mamas to create flourishing businesses and figure out a way to balance family life.

Mompreneur Blogs 1

b. Mompreneur Danielle: This beautiful blog has loads of tips on mental health, lifestyle, and entrepreneurship from one mom and mompreneur to another.

Mompreneur Blogs 2

c. The Mompreneur Effect: The Mompreneur Effect is a community to help mothers who already are mompreneurs, or would like to become mompreneurs.

Mompreneur Blogs 3

14. Great Facebook Groups that mompreneurs can join

These Facebook Groups on mompreneurship are ones that I’ve heard of as the best in the business …

a. The Power Mob: Belonging to the Mogul Mom site owner Melissa Bolton, this Group offers value for mompreneurs at different phases of personal and professional development.

Mompreneur Groups 1

b. Boss Mom Movement: Dana Malstaff has built a highly engaged and super helpful community of 16,000 mompreneurs who advice and support one another.

Mompreneur Groups 2

c. The Mompreneur Community: Allison Hardy, the owner of this Group says: “Mompreneurship is a winding road … feel free to share your victories, struggles, and everything in-between.

Mompreneur Groups 3

15. Great tools to increase mompreneur efficiency

There are a lot of handy tools that mompreneurs could use but these three are from my favorite collection …

a. 30/30: It’s a great app to fight procrastination. This clever task-management tool will make sure you stay on the assigned task by counting down the remaining time.

Mompreneur Tools 1

b. Intuit’s Mint: Mompreneurs have no time for fussy, cumbersome accounting. Mint is made just for snap-dash mompreneurs by the well-known accounting software company Intuit.

Mompreneur Tools 2

c. Happify: There’s a science behind feeling happy first – and thereby building enough energy for all that’s thrown at you and more. Mompreneurs who need more of that will love this tool.

Mompreneur Tools 3

16. Great outsourcing platforms for mompreneur help

I’ve graded three of the best workload outsourcing platforms in order of pricing and availability of great freelancers. Remember:it’s better to have a few outsource workers vetted pro-actively, rather than hiring them during an emergency.

a. Upwork: Work with the largest network of independent professionals and get things done—from quick turnarounds to big transformations.

Upwork Site Screenshot

b. Freelancer: Whatever your needs, there will be a freelancer to get it done. Post a job you need completed and receive competitive bids from freelancers in minutes.

Freelancer Site Screenshot

c. Fiverr: Find the right freelancer to begin working on your project within minutes. Find high-quality services at every price point. No hourly rates, just project-based pricing.

Fiverr Site Screenshot

17. High-flying mompreneurs: some terrific examples

There are hundreds upon thousands of mompreneurs inching so close to the million-dollar revenue mark in their businesses. But somehow it’s wonderfully inspiring to hear the stories of those that have crossed that magic million number. The mompreneurs I have picked here as my best examples have all grown business ideas that came to them courtesy their kids. Who knows the pain points of other moms than the mompreeurs themselves?

a. MICHELLE WELSH: Owner of the Safety Tat

SafetyTat Site Screenshot

Michelle Welsh and her three kids were at an amusement park one day when she suddenly got a fear that the kids could easily get lost in the crowds there … and with that Safety Tat was born. It had a simple idea. She started a business that could provide transferable, safe temporary tattoos onto children’s skin, with a message that read: “If lost, please call . . .” A customizable phone number could be added to this message. This little idea has grown into a million-dollar business.

Michelle Welsh

On the Safety Tat site Michelle has posted testimonials from various customers who have found their own reasons to love her tattoo idea. One of them is this wonderfully evocative story from a mother of an autistic child:

“Last year, I took my daughter with me to a toy convention, which was a work conference for me. It was a mommy/daughter bonding trip in Chicago. We don’t often get a lot of time together because I have three children and she is often busy with her activities. She is also autistic.

I have SafetyTat for her that will tell people of her abilities and give them my phone number. With all of the toys around, she got distracted and wandered off. I was so panicked.

As I ran to the information desk, my cell phone rang. It was a security guard who my little girl had found. Although she wouldn’t talk to them, she did show them her arm, which had SafetyTat applied. They called me and I found her within minutes. Thanks to Safety Tat, my daughter was safe! Every child needs them!”

What do you think is the secret sauce Michelle has used to convert her business idea into millions? Michele saw the potential in a problem that she faced every time she took the kids out to crowded places. Being able to spot a big business idea in everyday things that a mompreneur faces is what seems to have been her touchstone. The problem of keeping kids safe was dire enough that she believed she would get big target audiences – other parents like herself – as customers.

b. BRITTANY HELVY: Owner of Wellness Through Motherhood

Wellness Through Motherhood Site Screenshot

Brittany Helvy is a mompreneur who is also an online mentor, nutrition coach, and personal trainer. She is driven to help other mompreneurs find the perfect balance between their work and their inner selves so they can be healthy, happy, and confident. She works through her business site titled “Wellness Through Motherhood”, where she declares she is a “mama of three, thriving on caffeine, occasional wine, adventures, online shopping, boho vibes, and connecting with like-minded babes”.

Brittany Helvy

Brittany’s business mission is to coach and transform women into understanding their inner power and their purpose in life. She offers no one-size-fits-all solutions – it’s all tailormade mentoring. This is what she says to her clients:

“I am so delighted to have you here and for our paths to cross at one point or another. I adore meeting and connecting with women across the globe right here, online.

Each one of us has a story. A story that is incredible, unique, and full of love, laughter, tears and so many unpredictable moments that create us to be who we are today.

Thrilled to have you along for this exhilarating ride. Learning and growing through it all TOGETHER. Pour a glass, have fun reading, and send me a message by clicking the “Let’s Chat!” button”

What do you think is the secret sauce that makes Brittany run such a successful online venture while being a mom? She’s combined her love for both motherhood and life wellness with another third love – the love for conversing with and coaching others. Getting connected with other women seems to be more than just a business need for her, it’s part of her wellness too.

c. JEN BEKMAN: Owner of 20X200: Art For Everyone

20x200 Site Screenshot

Jen Bekman is a mompreneur who loves art, but believes it should be for everyone, within their purchasing power. She also believes that the Web is the perfect place to support emerging artists. So she launched an eCommerce site with an ever-changing collection of photography, prints and paintings – all priced starting at just $20.

Jen Bekman

You can hear the joy, pride and fulfillment she gets from her work. It’s in her voice, as she writes on her website::

“We’ve been introducing incredible artists and exceptional art to collectors since 2007. We believe that everyone can—and should—collect art, and that artists should have more opportunities to make a living making work.

We’re dead serious about the “everyone” part, too! We work hard to deliver an authentic collecting experience to novices and experts alike, and are unwavering about offering art that’s accessible for a wide range of budgets.

We’ve also got tons of art content to read up on on our blog, from essays by expert contributors like John Edwin Mason and Weston Naef, to curated selects from superstars in all sorts of fields, plus a podcast for your listening pleasure—all available to anyone with an internet connection.”

What do you think is the secret sauce that helped Jen turn her passion into a richly-rewarding mompreneur business? Her job is easier than that of a painter, whose works of art she sells. She is a curator, who needs to pick and choose what to display and sell from her site. This business model is so good for a mompreneur who is otherwise pressed for time. Her success comes more from using her fine instincts, and not from tiresome effort.

18. Growing and scaling tips for mompreneur businesses

Kendra Dahlstrom, Expert High-Performance Coach to Mompreneurs, has some outstanding tips for mompreneurs who are keen to grow and scale their businesses without breaking a sweat. It’s not only possible, business growth is important because with inflation eating into your money, you have to keep earning more to beat it. Here are some of Kendra’s tips:

  • Aim to “emerge” as an expert: Kendra suggests that “one of the best ways to emerge in your niche as a person who knows their stuff is to lead with your experiences and expertise.” Whatever business you’re building – whether you’re selling products or services – you have a lot of experience gained every day that can help someone else. Teaching what you know, therefore, becomes an extra stream of revenue. Kendra recommends writing a blog to showcase your expertise gained through mompreneur business management, to make other moms want to come to you for mentoring as well.

  • Aim to “expand” through collaborations: No mom can do all the work herself nor would she want to outsource expensive help. But the way out could be joint-ventures or collaborations with other mompreneurs. If the two of you have complementary products and can offer customers a bundle deal, why not team up? You can share the work and have a win-win-win (including the win for your common customers).

  • Aim to “excel” in business through not spreading yourself too thin: Of course, once you get into business, many side attractions and ideas will tempt you. But you have to keep reminding yourself to stay within your focus area. Forget those shiny new apps, and stop becoming a tool-buying junkie. Forget listening to too many experts and have just a few key role-models. Less is more. Keep your eyes peeled on the workflows and actions that bring you money, and don’t be tempted to do this-and-that instead.

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